“The New J. Crew?” & A Different Kind of Mayhem

Hello-Hello, and happy middle of the week to you.

Today we follow-up on a story previously discussed, the launch of a retail endeavor from two young women familiar with fashion, more from the Daily Mail.:

Fashion entrepreneur Chris Burch’s daughters, Pookie and Louisa, have struck out on their own this week with the launch of their label, Trademark.  The girls, 29 and 25, respectively, have been raised in fashion (they still call Tory Burch, married to their father until 2006, a stepmother).

Trademark

Trademark

That story is headlined this way:

Is this the new J.Crew? Chris Burch’s daughters Pookie and Louisa strike out on their own with Trademark – an affordable fashion label full of fun, preppy goods

More looks via Style.com.

StyleFile Blog

StyleFile Blog

There isn’t a huge selection of merchandise at this point, but you can certainly grasp the style aesthetic the young women are reaching for.  Below, the Wright Dress in navy plaid, also available in citronelle plaid ($168.)

Trade-mark

Trade-mark

Back to the Daily Mail story:

Part American preppy, part Japanese minimalism, Trademark offers pieces that have been created ‘to be worn as one’s own trademark,’ according to a statement issued by the label, which launched online yesterday following three years of development.

These modern art references manifest in Trademark’s color palette – an Albers-signature combination of natural tones like dark evergreen and rust, juxtaposed by brights and pastels including royal blue and pale yellow.

Trademark

Trademark

A touch of the blues the Daily Mail talked about: the Scuba Cardigan ($198) in royal blue, white, and turkey blue.

Trademark

Trademark

An unstructured jacket and skirt.

Trademark

Trademark

StyleFile’s story references the duo’s background and early exposure to fashion.

Trademark’s aesthetic is an extension of the pair’s own collective fashion experience, which includes summers spent in Nantucket searching for the consummate sweater; scouring Tokyo or other exotic locales for inspiration (much to Pookie’s dismay, as she hates flying); collecting Breton-striped shirts (Louisa); or even eavesdropping on Chris or Tory’s phone calls during car rides from suburban Philadelphia, where they were raised, to New York.

A few more pieces are shown below: on the left, the Koorsgaard Shirt ($128) and the same plaid seen above is used for the Saleci Skirt ($158). The skirt is available in solid colors as well.

Trademark

Trademark

Trademark has a crisp, casual vibe: there is very little clutter on the site and product images are hipper, clean of frou-frou embellishment.

Trademark

Trademark

Trademark offers some basic wovens: the Cole Shirt ($148) and Eliot Tee ($108) are both made of cotton poplin.

Trademark

Trademark

This is one of the stronger looks on the site, the Noddings Jacket ($188) and Mantinea Kilt ($168).

Trademark

Trademark

The Daily Mail article mentions something yours truly noticed:

One of the more distinctive things about the label, though, is how not one of the looks in its promotional images have been styled with heels.

In fact, Trademark is solely offering two flat sandal styles (from $195 to $225) as its introductory footwear designs – each one appearing as tapered riff on classic Birkenstock styles.
Read more:

Below, the Pajama Sandal ($225) in brown, navy and honey. While not my cup of tea it looks über-comfy. The other shoe is the Cadiz Sandal, $195, not shown here.

Trademark

Trademark

The brand also carries bags and jewelry; we show a selection of bangles.

Trademark

Trademark

Referring to the company’s styles as preppy does a disservice to the brand. By and large the looks are not “preppy,” a term being used more and more to define a fashion interpretation far removed from its original loose definition.  Many items in the Trademark line may, and will, appeal to those who also appreciate a Brooks Brothers shirt. But the company really targets a trendier, more youthful clientele. There are wonderful wardrobe basics one can build an entire look around and the pricing doesn’t seem outrageous, presuming the quality is excellent. StyleFile addresses the quality issue:

Their stock will be replenished with new styles every month, and is comprised of beautifully constructed garments that reflect the girls’ reserve and practicality.

This one will be fun to watch.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Also today, fashions created by someone much younger than the Burch sisters.

via

@2Sisters_Angie Instagram

Say hello to Mayhem, the 4-year old style child shown above. Here is more from the Huffington Post:

It became clear Angie’s daughter (she calls her “Mayhem”) was more interested in fashion than the average 4-year-old. Mayhem shunned her store-bought princess dresses and started wrapping herself with scarves and sheets creating her own styles.

Then one day Angie got tired of finding her clothes in Mayhem’s toy box and suggested they make a dress out of paper. Mayhem loved the idea and they haven’t stopped creating paper dresses since.

Writer Ilana Wiles of Mommy Shorts says the dresses started out this way, as relatively simple ‘fashions’ …

2Sisters_Angie

2Sisters_Angie

But they soon blossomed into far more complex designs.

Via @2Sisters_Angie Instagram

Via @2Sisters_Angie Instagram

As for the supplies Mayhem uses? Back to Ilana’s HuffPo story:

We use a lot of construction paper, but we also use tissue paper, wrapping paper, and gift bags. We have also used silk scarves, tulle, and aluminum foil. Basically, if we can find it laying around the house and it’s pliable, it’s fair game. Clear packing tape and glue are our adhesives of choice

Seeing these two frocks my immediate thought was, “Oh, dresses for St. Patrick’s Day and Mardi Gras”.

Fashions by Mayhem @2Sisters_Angie Instagram

Fashions by Mayhem @2Sisters_Angie Instagram

As for the question of how much is done by mom and done by daughter, the dress above right was created entirely by Mayhem with no help from her mother whatsoever.  Below, Mayhem at work.

Fashion by Mayhem

Fashion by Mayhem

The story about Mayhem that Ilana Wiles wrote for HuffPo brought an awful lot of attention to Mayhem and her family:

First, we can’t begin to tell you how humbling it is to have so many people reaching out to us and sharing that our story of making paper dresses has either touched or inspired them in some way. The kind words have brought smiles, laughs and at times, even tears (the good kind). I’m literally still shaking my head and saying “but we’re just hanging out at home making paper dresses…”.

Sometimes Mayhem channels a haute couture piece.

2Sisters_Angie Instagram via Huffington Post

2Sisters_Angie Instagram via Huffington Post

Mayhem’s mother wrote about the pressure of the notoriety:

…we put the brakes on. And stopped panicking about the hundreds of emails labeled “Urgent”, “Immediate Response”, “Oscars”, “Red Carpet”, “Exclusive” and “Extremely Time Sensitive”. We stopped answering the phone. And we started asking questions like: How do we keep Mayhem safe? How do we keep this fun? How do we maintain our integrity? How do we manage all this? Do we want something else to come from this? Which opportunities could we embrace and still have the kind of family life that is important to us? So we made phone calls and put some things in place to make life a little more manageable.

The Fashion by Mayhem site offers more than just photos of Mayhem in her dresses, there are tutorials and tips. Below, a look at the finished project for the “Anatomy of a Project Runway Dress“post.

Fashion by Mayhem

Fashion by Mayhem

Here are the elements of the dress.

Fashion by Mayhem

Fashion by Mayhem

Mayhem (with help from Mom) came up with a number of Oscar-related frocks this week.

Fashion by Mayhem

We’ll leave you with two more of my favorites: a pink and green style accompanied by this caption: “Because yesterday she learned what “flip your hair back” means ;)” The other just shrieks ‘spring,’ something desperately needed here in The Great Midwest and elsewhere.

Fashion by Mayhem

Fashion by Mayhem

That is one creative duo. If so inclined, visit Fashion by Mayhem or follow the Instagram account here.

 

// 6 Comments

6 Comments on “The New J. Crew?” & A Different Kind of Mayhem

  1. ajxpressionz
    March 5, 2014 at 4:40 pm (5 months ago)

    I give the Burch family props for never giving up. I “Wonder” if Stepmother will sue them for ripping her off by listening to her phone calls and receiving “insider” info. I hate how “preppy” has turned into a convenient hash tag to get attention on websites but it works. The Princess is correct, as usual, that this sparse collection reflects a more Tokyo vibe than a preppy one.
    On a brighter note, Mayhem’s collection (after sifting through all the protectionist mumbo jumbo), brings me back to a time when I used to create American Revolutionary War period costumes with Dennison crepe paper which one could sew like cloth but cost a fraction of the price. Simplicity and Butterick created patterns in the early 70s of historic costumes complete with directions for bustling, hoop skirts and creating fancy petticoats. My sister & I would spend hours doing the math for how many pkgs. of crepe would be req. to create these masterpieces from our baby sitting money for hours on end. I love it this child is so creative she wants to make her own dresses and gets support to do so. It’s amazing what Mommies can do when they have time to devote to one child at a time. This is something many modern Moms would give their eye teeth to do, to be able to foster such individuality especially in such a large brood of young ones. It helps to have help.

  2. amidprivilege
    March 5, 2014 at 4:43 pm (5 months ago)

    I’d definitely wear those Trademark looks. Kind of Celine meets Kate Spade. American Classic, right? Claire McArdell would be proud, even I am surely spelling her name wrong:). But I’m never comfortable with parents giving their small children a public presence. Generational, I suppose, it’s so common now.

  3. Stephanie
    March 6, 2014 at 10:44 am (5 months ago)

    That Wright dress is fabulous. If we now semi-associate “preppy” with overblown and bright and wild (Lilly, etc.), I’m not sure “preppy” is the best word for this brand. It’s clean, youthful, and modern, and I really like it, but “preppy” and “clean” don’t go together so well right now. (And clean, in my opinion, is the best part of preppy. I want more clean lines! Clean prints. That’s probably why the Wright dress appeals to me so much.)

    I do think, as Lisa says above, that American Classic is a good descriptor.

    The little girl is adorable. I love the documenting of what they’re doing. I agree that it’s odd to give a small child an internet presence, but this doesn’t feel so dangerous to me whereas lots of videos or deeply personal photos and blog posts do, if that makes sense. My very stage-oriented, performer son makes videos of himself doing various things (rapping, dancing, making rubber band bracelets, singing, playing the piano–you name it) and he wants a YouTube account to post them. However, he’s nine. It’s just not going to happen.

  4. akaleistar
    March 6, 2014 at 10:00 pm (5 months ago)

    I do like Trademark’s jacket and kilt, and the paper dresses are darling!

  5. The Enchanted Home
    March 9, 2014 at 11:24 am (5 months ago)

    That little girl is a riot but a bit scary at 4 years old (glad I am not her mother) she looks like she is going to be one hard to contain:)
    The looks are pretty, maybe a wee bit more minimalist than what i normally go for and not loving the shoe selection but that’s me…a few of the items are really cute though and things I would buy. Looks like design is in the genes in THAT family!

  6. VickyMacDonald
    March 13, 2014 at 7:28 pm (4 months ago)

    I adore Mayhem!

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: