About That Target Security Breach & Sarah Jessica Parker’s Shoe Collection

Hello-Hello, and welcome to a Friday Fun post. Mostly fun, I should say. In light of the ever-growing data breach at Target it seems almost a public service to include a bit of news updating that situation, in part because an element of it revealed today is simply mind warping to me.

First, some background. Target announced in mid-December that millions of customers’ debit and credit card data was stolen, estimating 40 million customers were impacted. As an effort to help/placate/I-don’t-know-what Target offered shoppers 10% off the Saturday and Sunday before Christmas. The next week Target revised the number of customers whose information was comprised. The new number was 70 million customers, not 40 million.

None of this was particularly troubling to either the Consort or myself. We both changed PIN numbers on our cards immediately and resolved to keep an eye on card transactions and bank accounts. Having been involved in many (I mean, *every* major breach of the last several years), we didn’t just shrug it off, but essentially perceived it as a part of life in today’s world. While we weren’t pleased about it, we weren’t enraged at Target. I’ve not heard from Neiman Marcus yet about that situation, but wouldn’t be surprised if I’m included in that breach as well.

But then I read this Forbes story by Clare O’Connor, a reporter who received an email from Target about the breach. (I also received mine, it came today.)

Target

Target

The cause for concern? Ms.O’Connor hasn’t shopped at Target in ten years.

I assumed the note was some sort of mistake, or perhaps even a phishing scam, because I have not shopped at Target for a decade.

I distinctly remember buying towels for my college dorm at a Philadelphia outlet of the department store around 2004. Since then, I haven’t lived anywhere near a Target, having spent the better part of the decade in London and now downtown Manhattan.

I checked my online banking summary to be certain a Target.com purchase hadn’t slipped my mind. Nope. Nothing.

So, what gives? I called Target to ask.

What Ms. O’Connor learned is that the criminals stole data going back that far. Ten years. We return to her story.

Meaning my personal data from that bath towel purchase in 2004 was stolen during this breach?

“I don’t have the specific time frame, but yes, that is the idea,” the press officer told me.

I don’t know about you, but for some reason that is troubling. Perhaps it’s because I worked so hard following the breaches at changing PIN numbers, getting a new card when appropriate, etc. Maybe it’s because the notion they took more than just bank information; they now have my address, my phone number, and my email. And that bugs me.

At any rate, if in need of info, here are a few links: Target’s website with info is here; the company’s Facebook page is here, and the company’s corporate pages (you can read news releases here if so inclined) are here. One addendum to the Neiman Marcus story: Reuters is reporting that breach may go as far back as July.

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On to topics that are more fun. Like the new shoe line Sarah Jessica Parker is doing for Nordstrom.

Nordstrom

Nordstrom

Glamour‘s story about the collection shares background.

What the heck took so long, right? “I’ve been thinking of doing this for years but never found the right fit,” says actress turned shoe designer Sarah Jessica Parker. “Everything needed to align, from quality to price point.”

It looks like there is a basic pump, this is the ‘Lady,’ it will retail at $350.  Ms. Parker says “This shoe is polite and old-fashioned. It suits a wide range of women with its simple silhouette.”

Glamour Magazine

Glamour Magazine

The collection is done in partnership with George Malkemus, president of Manolo Blahnik. Gayle King has a brief interview about the shoes on the Oprah site; from that story:

On the price point ranging from just under $200 to just under $500 a pair:
“Those are hard-earned bucks so I really tried to give women beautiful silhouettes and colors and excellent quality for their money. I didn’t want to do anything that says, ‘Oh, these shoes are 2014.’ I want my shoes to be a part of the world for a long time to come.”

More from Glamour’s story: the “Etta ($425) This one is for short ladies like me! I made the T-strap lower to lengthen the leg,” and the “Carrie” ($355), “Carrie is obviously one of my favorite people, and this is an ode to her. It’s a strong shoe that can be worn for day and night.”
Glamour Magazine

Glamour Magazine

There is a canvas flat called the Billie ($195), described by the actress this way: “I imagine every woman in these. They’re comfy and chic, especially with the low-cut front.”
Glamour Magazine

Glamour Magazine

I don’t know about your pocketbook, but mine isn’t ready to make that kind of investment in a casual canvas flat.
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Our final photo via Glamour shows the Alison ($485) granny boot (is that what you call the style…?), Ms. Parker says “This is for the girl who doesn’t want to wear a traditional ladylike heel but wants a bit of height.”
Glamour Magazine

Glamour Magazine

Every shoe has a touch of grosgrain ribbon, I believe it’s at the back of the shoe. Back to the Gayle King story:

On the thin touch of grosgrain ribbon on each shoe:
“The thing is, when I was growing up, we really didn’t have two nickels to rub together, but my mother always made sure that my sisters and I had two grosgrain ribbons in our hair. The rule was that we ironed them every single morning. We even had a special bureau dedicated to hair ribbons. I have them for my own daughters now, and my nieces wear them too. The grosgrain ribbons make SJP’s really identifiable to others and really personal to me.”

Hmmm. It’s very tough to come up with an opinion based only on photos, but from what little I’ve seen, my reaction is… muted. I’m not beyond spending $$$ for a truly well-made shoe that will be worn for years and years. Perhaps these are exceptionally well-constructed and extremely comfortable. I do love the Etta (black dress sandal) but overall the prices seem a little steep.  The collection launches Feb. 28th in the city with a pop-up shop, with visits to other cities to follow. The line will be available in certain stores (click here for a list), and also online.
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Our final item is merely eye candy. With Valentine’s Day approaching I have been pinning pictures of cookies on Pinterest, thinking I might bake a batch for The Consort. These are by Cute Sweet Things.

Cute Sweet Things

Cute Sweet Things

Now, nothing I come up with will look anywhere near as pretty as these, but that’s okay. I can borrow the general concepts and try to use elements of the designs.  This pretty batch comes from the Wacky Cookie Company.
Wacky Cookie Company

Wacky Cookie Company

And here’s a pretty group by Serendipitous Sweets on etsy.  (An FYI: it looks like the etsy shop I link to is closed.)

Serendipitous Sweets

Serendipitous Sweets

However, should I fail in my culinary duties, there are options. I can always order up a batch from Williams-Sonoma, they’re even personalized.

Williams-Sonoma

Williams-Sonoma

On that yummy-looking photo we say g’bye until next time!

4 Comments

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4 Responses to About That Target Security Breach & Sarah Jessica Parker’s Shoe Collection

  1. Oh noooooo! I’m just going to have to check my credit accounts 20 times/day:(

  2. ADORABLE cookies! Good luck with your baking; I may borrow the idea! <3
    Thanks for the info about Target–that's so interesting! Ugh, what a headache the thieves have caused for so many people!

  3. I can’t get over how adorable those personalized cookies are!

  4. I’m with you on the shoes. Perhaps she’s being more conservative on the first go around. It’ll be interesting to watch. Love the pretty cookies. :) .

    p.s. I have no idea why that post you were nice to comment on was resent 6 months after the first time it was posted. Have you ever heard of this happening?

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